Elysian Fields Farm
Community Supported Agriculture

Wednesday August 6th, 2003
Week 16

What's New This Week!!!

Produce
Full Share
Half Share
Size in Share
Farmer Market Value
Size in Share
Farmer Market Value
Tomatoes
2.5-3 lbs.
$5.00
2-2.5 lbs.
$4.00
Eggplant
1 lb.
$1.40
-
-
Cherry Tomatoes
1 pint
$2.50
-
-
Aneheim, Pablano, or Cubanelle
4-5 peppers
$1.50
-
-
Cucumbers
1 lb.
$1.25
-
-
Serano Peppers
a few
$1.00
a couple
$0.75
Blueberries
2 pints
$7.00
1 pint
$3.50
Butternut Squash
about 2 lbs.
$3.00
1-2 lbs.
$2.00
Summer Squash
1 lb.
$1.25
-
-
Onions
3
$1.00
3
$1.00
Colored Peppers
2 yellow
$2.00
one yellow, one red
$2.00
Sugarbaby Watermelon
-
-
1
$3.00
Total
 
$25.90
 
$16.25

What's growin' on?

Hello. The most exciting thing we did last week was to plant out the first planting of fall crops. We direct seeded more squash and cucumbers, and then planted fall beets, carrots, arugula, lettuce mix, spicy lettuce mix, turnips, radishes, spinach and herbs. After the rain we have had this weekend they are all germinating and look great! How exciting.

Recipes, Cooking, and Storage Tips

As I write this newsletter, I am also munching on some chips and salsa, the salsa made fresh from local produce. A friend, after buying some of the ingredients at market from me on Saturday, brought it by. You can't image how delicious it is. I hope that I can emphasize to you how wonderful local produce can be in the summer time. I also would like to use this opportunity to talk a bit more about peppers. This salsa that I am eating contains some of the farm's Serrano peppers, yet I would still categorize it as 'mild'. It has a wonderful subtle hint of heat that is very flavorful but not close to painful. Now, in my conversations with some of the share members, especially second year members - and intense lovers of the hottest of the hot peppers - Pete and Margaret, some of you like the intense heat, while others may be wary of it.

I would like to try to satisfy those who are fond of the heat. I would also like to encourage and educate those who are not so into really hot hot peppers on how to utilize and appreciate the wide array of pepper varieties that exist. I think the most important first step is getting members acquainted with their peppers. Try laying your peppers out on the counter in front of you as you read this. The Anaheim, or New Mexican Green Chile pepper, is a green color that would remind you of a green bell, yet the pepper is longer and narrower. It may be straight or it may be curled a bit, a little chubby, or straight and sleek. The Cubanelle Peppers are those that are a lighter sort of pale green / yellow. This pepper is also long and narrow, perhaps a little chubby. The Pablano (fresh green version of the Ancho pepper), is a darker green, a forest green. It is round from the top and ends in a point at the bottom, perhaps heart shaped? The do turn red so some of you may have gotten the red version of this pepper, although there were not many of those. The Serrano's are green turning red peppers a couple inches long, narrow and straight. You may have received a small pointed red pepper, perhaps three inches in length. This is a Pepperonchini that has turned, and is very hot. Finally, some of you may have received the Pasilla pepper. This has a similar color to the Pablano pepper, but is a few inches long and very narrow. And I am sure you are all familiar with the bell peppers you have received. Make note, not all of you have received all of the above peppers listed.

Now that you know what peppers are what, you should know what they taste like. If you are daring, you can just bite into them. Of course, this can be a little scary when it comes to peppers, so I will provide some more detailed information. Here is a basic 1-10 (10 hottest) heat scale for the above peppers: Habanero's score a 10. Serrano is a 6, Pablano and Pasilla are a 3, the Anaheim are anywhere from a one to a 2 and the bells and Cubanelles are in the zero range. Now, keep in mind that if you want to reduce the heat from any given pepper, you should not include the seeds of that pepper in the recipe you are working with.


Green Chile Sauce:
    4 green New Mexican chiles, roasted, peeled,
    stems and seeds removed, chopped
    1 medium onion, chopped
    2 garlic cloves, chopped
    2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    1 medium tomato, peeled and chopped
    1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
    1 cup water
Saute the onion and garlic in the oil until softened. Add the remaining ingredients, bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer for 30 minutes.

Vegetarian Huevos Rancheros:
    2 cups Green Chile Sauce (as above)
    4 to 8 eggs
    4 corn tortillas
    vegetable oil for frying
    1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese
Heat the sauce in a shallow frying pan. Crack the eggs into the sauce, cover with a lid, and poach to the desired firmness. Fry each tortilla in the hot oil for only a few seconds until soft, then drain. Place the eggs and sauce on the tortillas. Mound additional sauce around the edges. Top with the grated cheese and serve immediately.

What to look forward to...

Next week you will receive Acorn winter squash. Full shares will receive watermelons, and perhaps both shares.

Elise.

Elysian Fields Farm: Community Supported Agriculture

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