Elysian Fields Farm
Community Supported Agriculture

Wednesday June 5th, 2002
Week 6

What's New This Week!!!

Produce
Full Share
Half Share
Size in Share
Farmer Market Value
Size in Share
Farmer Market Value
Strawberries
1 pint
$2.50
-
-
Red Mead Radishes
1 bunch
$1.50
1 bunch
$1.50
Carrots
2 bunches
$4.00
1 bunch
$2.00
Conzalez Cabbage
1 large head
$2.50
1 head or 2 smaller head
$1.50
Cilantro
1 large head
$3.60
1 smaller head
$1.80
Sweet Peas
3/4 lb.
$3.00
1/4 lb.
$1.00
Spinach
1/2 lb.
$2.00
1/2 lb.
$2.00
Beets
1 bunch
$1.50
1 bunch
$1.50
Scallions
1 large bunch
$3.00
1 smaller bunch
$1.50
Total
 
$22.00
 
$12.00

Recipes and Cooking Tips.

As many of you may have noticed, I have attempted to add a bit of variety within each specific crop grown this season, thus far and soon to be. I have done so for a few reasons that I would like to share. First of all simply for diversity sake, to raise members interest in and surprise of their shares. Mainly I have done so though to raise my own as well as members awareness of the diversity that exists through out the vegetable world within our own culture as well as within others. I would also like to share with members what I have learned about these vegetables themselves as well as how to eat them. This week this leads me to the radish....Raphanus sativus to be exact. I know, I know, there really isn't all that much excitement raised about radishes, save the few and far between radish connoisseurs. But, being that I am now a reformed radish admirer and appreciator, I feel I can help to make my members as well.

This week members have received the Asian radish Red Meat (otherwise known as Beauty Heart or xin li mei, "in one's heart beautiful". ) These various names may be an indication to members who have not yet sliced this weeks radishes as to what makes them so special. The Red Meat radish sports a unique bright red, or perhaps fusia center. The radish is unique in its flavor as well as its ornamental appeal. Unlike many other common radishes, this Asian radish is actually at its mildest and tastiest THE BIGGER IT GETS! I have read it being compared to the size of a softball. My point is don't be afraid, slice it up and dive right in! Here are a few cooking tips and recipes for this weeks radishes. You can try slicing the Red Meat and using it as a 'cracker' topped with fish roe or other salty spreads.....mmmphhh..cream cheese and green olives? You can also grate it and serve it as a dressing over fish or meat.

Sauteed Red Meat Radish:
    1 lb. red-fleshed Asian radishes
    1 T butter
    1/4 t salt
Peal radishes and trim ends. Shred in a food processor. Melt butter on a hot skillet and add radishes over high heat until well coated. Reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for about five minutes, add salt to taste.

Sweet Peas with Radishes and Sesame:
    1/2 lb. sweet peas
    1 1/2 T sesame seeds
    1 1/2 T peanut oil
    2 T dry sherry
    1/2 cup thin sliced radishes
    1/4 t sugar
    Hot pepper and salt to taste
Heat sesame seeds until lightly toasted, about two minutes over low heat. Raise heat to high, add sweet peas and cook about 3 minutes. Add sherry, cook another few minutes. Add remaining ingredients and cook just to heat through. Serve immediately.

Fried Cabbage:
    Scallions chopped
    6 T oil
    1/2 t salt
    1/2 t curry powder
    1 medium sized cabbage, thinly shredded
    2 carrots sliced into rounds
    1 green bell pepper, chopped
Saute scallion in oil briefly. Add salt and curry powder, stir over medium heat heat 2-3 minutes. Mix in cabbage carrots and chopped green pepper. Pour in 1/2 cup water. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer until liquid is absorbed and cabbage is still slightly crunchy. For a variation, add chopped cilantro.

What's growin' on?

All I can say is Thank goodness for irrigation! As I am sure we all know there has been very little rain lately. The draught has been predicted to go on until this fall. Although unfortunate, it is okay thanks to my 5hp Honda pump. The pump resides next to my three-acre spring fed pond. It is a gas powered pump, pulling water out of the pond and onto four plus 'zones' of crop land. From the mainline coming out of the pump, water is piped into drip lines, thin plastic tubes laid on each bed. Water drips out of a slit made every twelve inches. This method is practically utilized in the humid summer months to minimize fungal diseases and to minimize excess evaporation while watering with overhead. I have been watering every day, all day this past week. The tomatoes ( now green on the vines), beans, squash, okra, peppers, eggplants, and melons sure are thankful. You can be expecting some of these goodies very shortly.

Please send any and all feedback to effarm@earthlink.net. Don't forget to view this newsletter on line at www.elysianfarm.com.
Elise.

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