Elysian Fields Farm
Community Supported Agriculture

Wednesday July 2nd, 2003
Week 11

What's New This Week!!!

Produce
Full Share
Half Share
Size in Share
Farmer Market Value
Size in Share
Farmer Market Value
Blueberries
2 pints
$7.00
1 pint
$3.50
Tomatoes
2-3 small
$1.50
1-2 small
$1.00
Sungold Cherry Tomatoes
1 pint
$1.50
1 pint
$1.50
Potatoes
2 lbs.
$3.20
1 lb.
$1.60
Cucumbers
2 lbs.
$2.50
1 lb.
$1.25
Summer Squash
1 lb.
$1.25
-
-
Garlic
3 heads
$2.00
2-3 heads
$1.00
Basil
1 large bag
$2.00
1 small bag
$1.00
Snap Beans
2 lbs.
$2.00
1/2 lb.
$1.00
Green Peppers
1 large
$1.00
2 medium
$1.00
Serano Peppers
2 or so
$0.50
-
-
Onions
-
-
2-3
$1.50
Total
 
$25.45
 
$15.35

What's growin' on?

As you all can see, this weeks share is full of new goodies. The tomatoes you have received is a variety called Early Pick, and as the name implies, is an early variety. There is one two hundred foot row of the Early Pick's, and one two hundred foot row of the Sungold Cherry tomatoes you have received (which by the way are SUPPOSED to be orange, not red). The remaining varieties of tomatoes comprise five more two hundred-foot rows, and this is in the first planting alone. The second planting, at about half the maturity of the first, follows with the same amount of rows and tomato plants. The third planting is comprised of four two hundred- foot rows. So, basically, the tomatoes are designed to last you for the rest of the season, if we are lucky we will be seeing these until the last share. My point here also is to let you know that this should be the lightest amount of tomatoes you receive, since it is the first picking off of one row only.

As you can all see the blueberries have finally ripened up. This means that not only will you be receiving them in your shares until mid to late August, but that you are all welcome and invited to come and pick your own blueberries in the patch at any time. The important thing for this to happen is for you to read the following directions and instructions carefully. The blueberry patch is actually not on the farm's property, but two or so miles down the road on rented property. So, I will give you directions to the patch itself, then instructions on were to start picking once you get there. I am going to assume all of you know how to get to downtown Hillsborough, the main road there being Churton St., or otherwise known as NC HWY 86. At the Northern end of downtown Hillsborough, 86 crosses HWY 70. From this point, you want to stay North going straight on 86 for ten or so more miles. When you get to the blinking yellow light, you will have 1.4 more miles to go. The driveway off 86 is on your right, and there is a sign that says "The Wizard's Cauldron" next to the gravel drive. You turn here, pass the Wizard's establishment and continue on the driveway until you reach the blueberry patch. I ONLY LEASE THE RIGHT HAND SIDE OF THE DRIVEWAY. Now, the right hand side is broken up into two varieties, the early variety., which is ripening now, is THE LAST FOUR ROWS FROM THE DRIVEWAY. So, you need to walk back towards the trees to the last four rows to find ripe berries. Okay, any questions about this call or email me any time. You are all welcome to come and pick at any time.

Lots to say this week! The green peppers you have received are the first picking of peppers. Not everyone knows that green peppers are actually immature colored peppers, that there is no specific 'green pepper' variety. You simply pick the pepper off the pepper plant before it turns red or orange. Because of this, I went through the peppers and thinned them out, picking the green peppers closer to the ground or forming in a tight spot. While doing this I leave a good number of other green peppers on the plants to ripen and turn red or orange in about three to four weeks time. Because of the value of the colored peppers, I tend to not hand out too many of the green, but you will be receiving some now and again. The Serrano peppers are actually very similar to Jalapeno peppers and are very spicy so beware!

So, as you can see the snap beans this week are purple! This is a specialty variety that has a different and fun color with the same great taste as green beans. The purple color tends to fade to green when cooked, but they are also great raw so enjoy!

The past week has been pretty eventful, with the blueberries coming on and getting pickers lined up, to the pump breaking and things nearly getting too dry prior to the last two days of rain. The week has been pretty good overall.

I would like to also thank all members who have submitted a survey through the web page. They are very valuable to me, just knowing the thoughts and opinions of the members helps the CSA in many ways. If you haven't filled one out yet I encourage you to do so, through the web page you can submit it directly to my email account.

Recipes, Cooking, and Storage Tips

A few members at market have asked the best way to store fresh Basil. One thing to keep in mind about basil is that it does not hold for very long, so even in the best conditions you may only have your fresh basil for three to four days. The best conditions for the basil is to, most importantly, keep it in an airtight bag and to keep it in the refrigerator. Tomatoes, on the other hand, DO NOT want to be kept in the refrigerator. In fact, it actually takes away greatly from their flavor. For this reason, I try to include tomatoes in each share that are of varying degrees of ripeness. This way members can leave their tomatoes in the brown paper bag they receive them in on the counter for them to ripen and eat them through out the week. You want to wait until the tomatoes are at the peak of their color in order to get the fullest flavor from them. So, for example, the deeper red the tomato the sweeter it will be!

Cucumber Salad:
    3 cucumbers
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    2/3 cup white vinegar
    1/2 cup sugar
    1/4 teaspoon peeper
    2 tablespoons fresh basil
    as many orange Sungold Cherry tomatoes as you
wish Mix!


Roasted Green Peppers:
    green peppers
    low fat cheese
With tongs or long handled fork, hold pepper over open flame until skin blisters all around, turning occasionally. Cool and peel skin away. Open pepper from top carefully; remove seeds and core. Fill with cheese and pep in low oven until cheese melts and conforms to shape of pepper. Chill overnight. Slice pepper and serve with other vegetables or use in a sandwich.


Green (or purple) Bean Salad:
    1/4 cup minced onions
    2 tablespoons oil
    1 tablespoon vinegar
    chopped basil
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    2 garlic cloves
    pepper to taste
    1/2-1 pound snap beans
Mix all ingredients except beans. Marinate raw beans in dressing for 24 hours.

Once again, please send any feedback, thoughts or concerned my way! Thanks! Elise.

Elysian Fields Farm: Community Supported Agriculture

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