Sept 7, 2016, Week 18

What’s growing on?
Hello, Members! This is the last delivery for our Spring/Summer CSA. Thank you for supporting our farm this season, and for making our lives as farmers possible! We will be sending out a short and anonymous survey to you via email next week. We hope that you will take a few minutes to fill it out, as it really, really does help us learn how to give our CSA members what they want.

We will have a two to three week break before our Fall CSA begins, and will keep those of you who have signed up for that informed as when that will begin as the weeks progress. We deliver your share in paper bags on the final week so that you don’t have to take a box home and not have a way to return it. If you normally bring a bag to unload your box, you don’t have to worry about doing that this week! If you have some wax boxes collecting dust at your house, this would be a good week to return them, thanks!

We wish we had a few more diverse things to give you the this week (and the last two), the crop disease we received from the excess rain we had in July and for the first two weeks of August has really caught up with us and we are in what we call a big time lull. We hope you have been enjoying the first of the fall greens these past weeks though, as we look forward to having more of them and other fall crops in a few weeks. Below I have added a few pictures of our fall crops, the first our “carrot fortress”, which is hoops holding up insect netting to keep our grasshoppers and caterpillars that want to eat our newly germinated carrot seedlings. If you remember in a previous newsletter I talked about how our first round was eaten by said pests. We had the insect netting laying on the ground on top of the crop then, and apparently this still allowed for the insects to have access through the small holes to the crop and soil underneath. The hoops, we hope, will stop this! The next picture is of our lovely brassica plants, broccoli, cauliflower and kale, although this is a week old and they have already doubled in size!

That’s all for now! We hope you enjoy everything and as always let us know if you have any feedback, thoughts or concerns.
All the best,
Elise, Beth, Avery, Meredith and Eric

Recipes:

Semi Sweet Potato Mash with Caramelized Onions

1 pound russet potatoes, peeled and diced
1 pound sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
1 large onion, halved and thinly sliced
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
Pinch cayenne pepper
Pinch freshly ground nutmeg
Sea salt & pepper

1. In a large saucepan, cover the potatoes with cold water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Simmer until the potatoes are fork tender, about 10 to 15 minutes. Drain and return to the pot. Using a masher or fork, crush the potatoes until no chunks remain. Whisk in the butter and season to taste with the cayenne, nutmeg, and salt.
2. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large cast iron skillet. Sauté the onions over medium-high heat until soft and beginning to brown, about 8 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue to cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until very browned and caramelized, about 30 minutes. This is a low and slow process and shouldn't be rushed - your onions will be about 1/4 of the size they were at the beginning. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
3. Transfer the potatoes to a casserole dish and top with the caramelized onions. Can be make 2 days ahead and reheated in a 350 degree oven.

What's in the box?

Regular Share

Quantity

Storage Info

Notes

Sweet Potatoes

2 lb.

Take them out of the bag and put them on your counter, do NOT refrigerate, they do not want to be held that cold. They will store for many months.

These sweet potatoes are fresh dug, which means they have come out of the ground recently and have yet to be cured. At this stage, they have a bit of a starchiness to them that is similar to regular potatoes. The longer you let them sit on your counter, the sweeter they will become. They will hold for four or more months so you have time if you want it. We have not washed them as it breaks their dormancy and they will not store as long. *See Recipe Below!

Mixed baby greens

1 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer.

This is a mix of baby Asian and baby mustard greens. You can eat it raw as a salad or cook it as you would any kind of greens.

Garlic

3 small

Counter

This variety is called German extra hardy. These heads will store for some time so no need to hurry and eat them.

Onions

2

Counter or refrigerator

 

Peppers or eggplant or summer squash

1 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer.

We have been making not of who gets what so you will not receive the same thing two weeks in a row.

 

Full Share

Quantity

Storage Info

Notes

Sweet Potatoes

3 lb.

Take them out of the bag and put them on your counter, do NOT refrigerate, they do not want to be held that cold.

These sweet potatoes are fresh dug, which means they have come out of the ground recently and have yet to be cured. At this stage, they have a bit of a starchiness to them that is similar to regular potatoes. The longer you let them sit on your counter, the sweeter they will become. They will hold for four or more months so you have time if you want it. We have not washed them as it breaks their dormancy and they will not store as long. *See Recipe Below!

Mixed baby greens

1 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer.

This is a mix of baby Asian and baby mustard greens. You can eat it raw as a salad or cook it as you would any kind of greens.

Arugula

1/2 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer.

 

Onions

2

Counter or refrigerator

 

Kabocha Winter Squash

2-2.5 lb.

These don’t store as well as other winter squash, you can put it in your refrigerator if you wish to hold it for more than a week or two.

This winter squash is delicious, simply put. It is hands down better than any other. It has smooth, sweet, creamy flesh. Cut in half, take out the seeds, rub flesh with olive oil, put flesh down on a baking sheet and roast until soft. From that point, your options are endless.

Eggplant

1 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer.