May 4, 2016, Week 2

What’s growing on?
Hello, CSA Members. Welcome to our second week of deliveries. We hope you enjoyed all the vegetables you received last week, and that you are ready for more! We love to hear about any creative or new ways you may have discovered to prepare our vegetables, so shoot us an email if you think of it.

As farmers, we tend to always be thinking about the weather…..checking the weather……talking about the weather…….sometimes stressing out about the weather and sometimes just enjoying the weather as we work. In short, it’s all about the weather. Therefore in my update about the farm I can’t help but comment on the weather and how it is affecting the crops! For weeks up until the start of the CSA we had very hot and DRY weather. I am one to be very happy with dry weather since we have the means to irrigate our crops right at their roots where they need it with drip irrigation lines. Dry weather then allows for less weeds to grow where we don’t want them too, keeps the grass in our driveways shorter, allows for tractor work to be done at our leisure, planting to be done at our leisure, weeding to be done at our leisure…..I think  you see the point. The most important thing about dry weather this time of year though is that our strawberry crop desperately loves it. After saying all of this I must point out the obvious, that we have had lots of rain in the last week! We have been fortunate that we have not received hail though like some, as that would be devastating to many of the crops. The rain has done a number on our strawberries all the same, not having a skin, strawberries simply rot on the plant in times of excess moisture. As we harvested strawberries for you Tuesday afternoon we sadly had to also pull our any rotten berries to discard, about half our crop. Of course aside from the strawberries we are also unable to plant and hoe this week as we had planned due to wet ground, YET, on the bright side it does open up time for us to hand weed in row of our second planting of carrots. Always work to be done!

That’s all for now! We hope you enjoy everything and as always let us know if you have any feedback, thoughts or concerns.
All the best,
Elise, Beth, Avery, Meredith and Eric

Recipes:
Creamy Green Garlic
This recipe can be used as a topping for baked potatoes, stirred into pasta or scrambled eggs, or used as a filling for ravioli or an omelet.
Ingredients:
7 large green garlic
4 tbsp butter
1 tsp salt
1 cup heavy cream
black pepper
parsley or tarragon (optional)

Directions:
Remove any yellow outer leaves from the green garlic. Trim the root end and any dark green leaves. Save the dark green leaves for stock. Cut the green garlic in half lengthwise. Remove any of light green layers that feel tough. Slice the green garlic thinly into half moons using the light green part all the way to the root end. You need 4 cups total. Place sliced green garlic in a big bowl of water to wash off grit. Lift green garlic out of water and drain. The grit will have settled to the bottom of the bowl and you can now dump the water without the grit getting back on the green garlic.
Melt butter on medium low heat in a medium size saucepot. Add green garlic (it can be damp) and salt. Toss green garlic so it is coated with the butter. Cover partially with a lid and cook until soft, about 15 minutes. Add the cream, let it come to a simmer, and then reduce heat to low. Cook until cream thickens, about 10 minutes. Add several cracks of black pepper. You can add chopped herbs or even a bit of fresh goat’s milk cheese. Serve in any manner listed above or follow your own instincts.

Frittata of Turnip and Kale
Makes 4 side servings
Ingredients:
3 turnips
salt and pepper to taste
olive oil
5 eggs, room temperature
1 bunch kale*, washed and chopped

Directions:
Break the 5 eggs in a bowl and mix well, using a whisk or a fork. Add a glug of olive oil and kale to eggs, mix all well, set aside.
Heat olive oil in a large, heavy skillet. Add turnips and cook until caramelized. Remove to a bowl. Raise heat to medium high and add egg mixture to very hot pan. Using a fork, stir the eggs in a circular motion towards the center – eggs will cook very quickly. When the bottom of the frittata is well set, level the eggs and cover with a lid to cook the top, keeping heat on medium. When completely cooked, slide off onto a serving plate. Add the turnips, and serve warm. You can also garnish with a young, spring cheese.

What's in the box?

Regular Share

Quantity

Storage Info

Notes

Head Lettuce

1 head

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

 

Spinach

½ lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

 

Turnips

1 bunch

Plastic bag, crisper drawer. Remove the greens and store in a separate bag from the roots in order to store the roots for an extended period (the greens take moisture from them).

These are like no turnip you have eaten before! Sweet and tender you can eat them raw like an apple. Seriously. An Asian salad turnip, the Hakurie variety is unique in that it is excellent chopped raw in salads or vegetable plates. Remember to eat your turnip greens also! You can sauté them with garlic or treat as you would any green. Also, see recipe below!

Strawberries

1 pint

Remove from the paper bag and store in the pint in the refrigerator.

Wash and cut right before use only as this will shorten their shelf life.

Baby Kale

2/3 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

Tender, you can eat raw as a salad or cook. See recipe below!

Green Garlic

2 stalks

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

Green Garlic in the spring may be chopped or diced raw into green or pasta salads, sautéed in place of bulb garlic, sprinkled onto pizza, eaten raw, or used anywhere garlic flavor is desired. The strong, fresh flavor holds up well to grilling; slice off the tops, precook them in boiling water until tender, then brush with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper before grilling, just until grill marks appear on each side. Also, see recipe below! This will most likely be your last week of green garlic as it starts to form heads and lose its tenderness this time of year. We hope you enjoy the brief window each spring when you can eat green garlic!

 

Full Share

Quantity

Storage Info

Notes

Head Lettuce

2 heads

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

 

Spinach

1 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

 

Turnips

1 bunch

Plastic bag, crisper drawer. Remove the greens and store in a separate bag from the roots in order to store the roots for an extended period (the greens take moisture from them).

These are like no turnip you have eaten before! Sweet and tender you can eat them raw like an apple. Seriously. An Asian salad turnip, the Hakurie variety is unique in that it is excellent chopped raw in salads or vegetable plates. Remember to eat your turnip greens also! You can sauté them with garlic or treat as you would any green. Also, see recipe below!

Baby Kale

2/3 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

Tender, you can eat raw as a salad or cook. See recipe below!

Beets

1 bunch

Plastic bag, crisper drawer. Remove the greens and store in a separate bag from the roots in order to store the roots for an extended period (the greens take moisture from them).

An easy way to prepare beets is to heat your oven to 400 degrees, wrap the beets in tin foil and roast for as long as it takes for them to be soft and easily pierced with a fork. Remove from oven and allow to cool. Peel the skin off, at this point it comes off easily just by rubbing with your fingers. Now you can chop the beet and eat as is or add to any recipe. The roasting really brings out the beets natural sweetness. Remember to eat your beet greens as well! You can treat them as you would spinach or Swiss Chard as they are in the same family and taste similar.

Green Garlic

2 stalks

 

Green Garlic in the spring may be chopped or diced raw into green or pasta salads, sautéed in place of bulb garlic, sprinkled onto pizza, eaten raw, or used anywhere garlic flavor is desired. The strong, fresh flavor holds up well to grilling; slice off the tops, precook them in boiling water until tender, then brush with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper before grilling, just until grill marks appear on each side. Also, see recipe below! This will most likely be your last week of green garlic as it starts to form heads and lose its tenderness this time of year. We hope you enjoy the brief window each spring when you can eat green garlic!