May 18, 2016, Week 4

What’s growing on?
Hello, Members! It’s here, literally one of our busiest weeks of the year. Harvesting strawberries, carrots and peas take TIME, thus not leaving much for all the work we need to do. While our first planting of tomatoes are growing strong, they are in need of their once over suckering, the second planting of tomatoes are due to go in the ground, and we need to plant our ¼ acres of winter squash this week. Of course all of this rain may prevent us from doing this work anyhow, even if we have time. Good thing there is always next week!

We are excited to have carrots, one of our favorite crops to grow. We grow a large amount of carrots in our two plantings of them and hope to have them from now until the middle of June. Some of the areas we grow in have very sandy soil, perfect to allow the carrots to shoot down and grow long and straight. Heavy clay or rocky soil can be prohibitive to the carrots and make them short or crooked. Many of the local restaurants around town are cooking with our carrots, Pizzeria Mercato has an excellent roasted carrot appetizer with our carrots, and The Lantern is fermenting them, cutting them very thin lengthwise then adding them to a salad.

That’s all for now! We hope you enjoy everything and as always let us know if you have any feedback, thoughts or concerns.
All the best,
Elise, Beth, Avery, Meredith and Eric

Recipes:
Bok Choi, Carrot, and Apple Slaw

1 lb bok choi (small to medium sized heads), halved or quartered lengthwise
Coarse salt and fresh ground pepper
1 apple, peeled and cut into matchsticks
2 large carrots, shredded
3 T fresh lemon juice
1 T vegetable oil
1 t finely grated peeled fresh ginger

  1. Rinse the bok choi under cold water to remove grit. Cut crosswise into thin strips; place in a large colander, and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon salt. Toss to coat. Top with a plate that fits inside the colander; weight with a heavy object (such as a skillet or canned good). Set aside in sink to drain.
  2. In a large bowl, mix apple, carrots, lemon juice, oil, and ginger. Add bok choi; season with salt and pepper. Toss and serve.

 

Garlicky Sesame-Cured Broccoli Salad

1 1/2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon kosher salt, more to taste
2 heads broccoli, 1 pound each, cut into bite-size florets
3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 fat garlic cloves, minced
2 teaspoons cumin seeds
2 teaspoons roasted (Asian) sesame oil
large pinch crushes red pepper flakes

1. In a large bowl, stir together the vinegar and salt. Add the broccoli and toss to combine.
2. In a large skillet, heat the olive oil until hot but not smoking. Add the garlic and cumin and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in the sesame oil and pepper flakes. Pour the mixture over the broccoli and toss well. Let sit for at least 1 hour at room temperature, or chilled, up to 48 hours (chill it if you want to keep it for more than 2 hours). Adjust the seasonings (it may need more salt) and serve.

What's in the box?

Regular Share

Quantity

Storage Info

Notes

Carrots

1 bunch

Plastic bag, crisper drawer. Remove the greens from the roots in order to store the roots for an extended period (the greens take moisture from them).

*See Carrot recipes below!

Strawberries

1 pint

Remove from the paper bag and store in the pint in the refrigerator.

Wash and cut right before use only as this will shorten their shelf life.

Sugarsnap Peas

½ lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

These are not shelling peas, you can eat the shell and pea all in one!

Broccoli

1 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

*See recipe below!

Head lettuce

1 head

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

 

Cabbage OR Boc Choi

1 head / bunch

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

*See Boc Choi recipe below!

 

Full Share

Quantity

Storage Info

Notes

Carrots

1 bunch

Plastic bag, crisper drawer. Remove the greens from the roots in order to store the roots for an extended period (the greens take moisture from them).

*See Carrot recipes below!

Strawberries

1 pint

Remove from the paper bag and store in the pint in the refrigerator.

Wash and cut right before use only as this will shorten their shelf life.

Sugarsnap Peas

1 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

These are not shelling peas, you can eat the shell and pea all in one!

Broccoli

1.5 lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

*See recipe below!

Baby lettuce mix

½ lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

 

Spinach

½ lb.

Plastic bag, crisper drawer

 

Beets

1 bunch

Plastic bag, crisper drawer. Remove the greens and store in a separate bag from the roots in order to store the roots for an extended period (the greens take moisture from them).

An easy way to prepare beets is to heat your oven to 400 degrees, wrap the beets in tin foil and roast for as long as it takes for them to be soft and easily pierced with a fork. Remove from oven and allow to cool. Peel the skin off, at this point it comes off easily just by rubbing with your fingers. Now you can chop the beet and eat as is or add to any recipe. The roasting really brings out the beets natural sweetness. Remember to eat your beet greens as well! You can treat them as you would spinach or Swiss Chard as they are in the same family and taste similar.