Elysian Fields Farm
Community Supported Agriculture

May 11th, 2005

Week 2

Crop
Half
Cost
Full
Cost
Strawberries
1 quart
$5.00
1 quart
$5.00
Spinach
1/2 lb
$3.00
3/4 lb
$4.50
Lettuce
1 romaine
$2.00
1 red leaf, 1 boston
$4.00
Turnips
1 small
$1.50
1 larger
$2.00
Radishes
1 bunch
$1.75
1 bunch
$1.75
Kale
1 small
$1.50
1 larger
$2.00
Braising Mix
1/2 lb
$3.00
1 lb
$6.00
Dill
1 bunch
$1.00
1 bunch
$1.00
Total
$18.75
$26.25


Recipe of the Week:
1 bunch of kale, stems removed, leaves cut
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon butter
2 large cloves garlic, minced
1 onion, chopped
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
juice from 1 fresh lime
black pepper

Steam kale until slightly wilted. In large skillet, heat oil and butter, add garlic, onion and ginger; saute until onion is soft. Toss in kale. Cover and cook on low heat until kale is tender. Add lime juice and pepper to taste.

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Farm work day and tour day is on for this Sunday, May 15th from 1pm to 4pm! I apologize to the folks who won't be able to make it because of graduation, but no worries, there will be another later this summer. I was unable to purchase the straw bale mulch for the asparagus beds as I had hoped, so we will be doing some other chores instead for those who wish to work. I hope to do some transplanting (winter squash as well as second planting of cucumbers and melons). This job is not really suited for the little ones, so I will come up with something a little more straight forward for them (but important) in the next couple of days. It would help if you could email me to let me know if you plan to attend or not (if you have already no need to do so again). I will email folks directions later this week, hope to see you all out here!

What's going on? Hello folks, I hope you enjoyed your shares last week. Despite the fact that the spring was slow in coming and some crops where a little behind, I feel good about the diversity and amount of crops available at this point from the farm. The only crop I feel is not performing as well as it could or should are the strawberries. Of all the crops to have low yields in, this one pains me the most. Everybody loves strawberries, especially organically grown strawberries. Unfortunately the deer caused a good bit of damage in the patch this winter, they love to eat the green leaves down as often as they can get by the deer fence. With lower yeilds, I am unable to give folks as many as I would like to, or have in previous years. I usually have no problem giving full shares 2 quarts and half shares one, but this year we are going to have to be okay with receiving a little less than usual. So, this week I gave half and full shares one quart, and then next week if we are still a bit tight, I will give the full shares the extra amount. We can alternate like that for the next few weeks, as strawberries usually last through the month of May and maybe into the first week of June. We'll see. I can already see some new growth in the tomatoes and peppers this week. They just sort of sat around in the gorund during the cold weather we had last week, not liking it one bit I am sure. The cucumbers, summer squash and greens beans are up and looking good as well. My new intern starts full time next week, her name is Katie and she is graduating with a BS in Environmental Studies from Carolina this weekend. She is sweet and energetic, and I look forward to having her help and company. My website is up and functioning so please check it out when you can. The newsletters will be posted there once a month, at the end of the month (so four at a time), rather than each week. Also, at the end of this month I hope to have some pictures of the farm posted along with the newsletter as I have been utilizing my new digital camera. It is hard not to take endless pictures of my dogs and cats, which of course will be posted, but I have also taken some great shots of the crops at various stages of growth.

Storage and Produce Information
The white Japanese variety of Turnips that you have received this week (Hakurie) are great eaten raw or cooked. There is no need to peel them, simply trim away any damaged areas. Raw you can add to a veggie platter with dip or try grated into salads or slaws. You can also boil, steam ,mash, saute or roast turnips (my favorite). Turnips will last in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for 1-2 weeks, while the greens should be eaten as soon as possible. The braising mix you have received can also be eaten raw as a salad or you can saute them in a stir fry. The mix containes red and green mustard greens, Red Russian kale, arugula, Mitzuna and Tatsoi. Try adding the braising mix greens, spinach and turnips roots and greens to a saute. The Kale you have received this week is a new variety for me, it is called Wild Garden Mix. It is a mix of red and green feathery kales, a variety that is the result of a cross between Red Russian and Winterbor.

What to Look Forward To...
Next week you can look forward to more strawberries, lettuce, and turnips for sure. We will also have cilantro and possibly arugula, kale, and beets....Sometimes it can be hard to tell exactly when a certain crop is going to be ready, but we will see these crops soon. There are two more plantings of spinach on deck, as well as kohlrabi, broccoli and cauliflower. That is all for now folks, hope you will enjoy this week's share. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments or concerns. Elise.

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