Elysian Fields Farm
Community Supported Agriculture

Wednesday September 11th, 2002
Week 20

What's New This Week!!!

Produce
Full Share
Half Share
Size in Share
Farmer Market Value
Size in Share
Farmer Market Value
Tomatoes
2-3 lbs.
$6.00
1-2 lbs.
$4.00
Cherry Tomatoes
1 pint
$2.00
1 pint
$2.00
Bell Peppers
1 lb.
$1.50
-
-
Winter Squash
1-2 lbs.
$2.00
1 lb.
$1.50
Basil
1 bag
$1.00
1 bag
$1.00
Radishes
1 bunch
$1.50
1 bunch
$1.50
Total
 
$14.00
 
$10.00

What's growin' on?

A quick overview of the crops tells us the following: The last planting of tomatoes is coming on strong now and should continue for a good few weeks, the eggplant are gearing up for another go at it with a new set of blossoms abundant, the peppers are available yet on the smaller side due to some water issues, the fall beets are noticeably growing daily (Golden, Chiogga, Bulls Blood and Red Ace) and healthy thus far, the fall radishes are coming on and will be available for a couple few weeks, cilantro will appear in next weeks or the weeks after share, scarlet and white turnips are looking okay thus far and will be available in a couple of weeks, the okra and summer squash are winding down, as the winter squash is thinning out in the cooler as well, the last planting of watermelon and cucumbers has yet to mature, lettuce heads are growing and will be available in a couple of weeks, and I think that about covers it for now as an overview. I may have forgotten an item or two at present, but unfortunately if something was not mentioned it is because it has not faired well in these pest ridden, variable weather burdened past few months. It has been a hard end of the summer for a lot of growers, and I not being the only who has been plagued by Fall Armyworms, Beet Hoppers, and certain crop losses.

As for a look ahead, we see the following in the near future: This years strawberry plants arrive next week and will be ready to put in the ground (strawberries need to be treated as an annual crop in these parts due to its inability to withstand the summer humidity and heat that cause rampant fungal problems with the plant), a variety of Garlic has been ordered and will be put in the ground next month, Egyptian Walking onions and multiplier onions (both onions that reproduce by bulblets that can be saved and replanted similar to garlic, as well as being an edible treat) have been ordered and will go in the ground in October, new ground is being prepared for winter cover crops such as Crimson Clover and Annual Rye Grass, and more new crops are being considered for next year (peanuts, artichokes, cardoon????) any ideas? Let me know if you have any questions or comments, I am available to you.

Once again, please send any and all feedback to effarm@earthlink.net. Also check out the web page at www.elysianfarm.com to view the recent updates Scott has made. Enjoy! Elise.

Recipes and Cooking Tips

You have received Sweet Dumpling winter squash this week, a variety similar to Delicata squash. The sweet dumpling can be cut in half and baked, growing to single size servings and larger (although never that much larger.) Easter egg radishes are in your bags, interesting enough the color of the radish seems to give away its spice lever, as a hint the dark purple ones seem to be a bit hotter than the others (at least when I tried them). You have received a mixed bag of tomatoes, some more Green Zebras (quickly becoming one of my prized favorites, I would be interested to hear you thoughts?), Romas and some Celebrities or random Heirlooms. I am tempted to give you some tomatoes recipes but really I feel that I should encourage you to just enjoy the tomatoes as they are. Their taste seems so exquisite in their simplest form, try slicing them and topping with salt and pepper, maybe some vinegar? They really are just great as a side dish. Many of my market customers comment to me that the Sungold Cherries are a great treat as is as well. The claim that they snack on them as if they were candy, with their sweet burst of flavor. This is a great way to enjoy those little guys, as well as chopped up and thrown into just about any dish I can think of for a small burst of random flavor.

If members have a favorite tomato recipe or means of preparing tomatoes I would love to hear it, I am excited that the last planting of tomatoes appears strong and healthy at present, and that we can look forward to more of such a summer delicacy. I hope everyone has a good week, and I would love to hear from anyone who has any questions, comments or concerns. Elise.

Elysian Fields Farm: Community Supported Agriculture

www.ElysianFarm.com Contact